Through-my-eyes 

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Love

Psychology was a subject I undertook purely out of curiosity. I thought I might find some of the concepts interesting and I was right. The most interesting topic I studied was the section on gender differences. I remember entering this unit with a very shallow mindset, expecting huge differences in both brain structure and brain function between males and females.

I was surprised.

What I found was that males and females are not so different. Sure, there were a few differences which most theories agreed on. But the most interesting thing I discovered was that behaviour is learned and develops over many years. ‘Male’ and ‘female’ traits are instilled into children from a young age, which drives them to perform in certain ways depending on what they think is gender appropriate.

Does this mean that a child’s behaviour is truly a reflection of their parents? Perhaps. But more specifically, it is a representation of the environment they are being raised in and what they are being exposed to.

In the current era, violence is abundant, and broadcasting is more intimate and involved than ever. Even if parents don’t wish it, their children are being exposed to these acts of violence and are presented with a negative view of the world from an early age.

The problem is a paradox of sorts, because acts of violence are a lose-lose situation. On one hand, the news absolutely must be broadcasted, in detail, so the general public knows what is happening in the world. On the other hand, the news seems to contain more and more horrific stories these days that children are being exposed to. I want to be informed, but not at the detriment of the next generation.

The rise in terrorism scares me, but what scares me more is the upcoming generation. Exposure to such violent affairs can only be a bad thing, especially during the crucial years of learning behaviours. It’s something to think about.

Mim x

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